Muzzle Myths

“Muzzles have done more to protect owners and their dogs than legislation ever will”, a quote by Dr. Mugford.

Muzzle myths

A muzzle is not a bad thing. 

Yes, that’s right let us say it again. A muzzle is not a bad thing. Many people feel a tinge of shame, fear, or embarrassment when they are told their dog should be muzzle trained. I would love to see the muzzle stigmas removed. Here is my attempt to help dog owners understand muzzles just a little bit better.

 LET’S START BY BUSTING SOME MYTHS:

My dog can’t eat or drink with a muzzle on. 

There are different types of muzzles. Some are ideal for vet clinics and others are perfect for training because they allow your dog to drink, pant, and eat through the muzzle. The best muzzles for training are basket muzzles.

 A muzzle will not fit my dog. 

Yes, it will. Deerhounds, Rotties, Pugs, and Great Danes there is a muzzle that will comfortably fit every dog breed. There is a muzzle on the market for every dog in every shape and size… heck there are even goat muzzles available. Baskerville makes muzzles that can be purchased, heated up in boiling water, and custom fit to your dog’s face. Make sure that you pick a muzzle that fits your dog.

Muzzles will make my dog look scary looking. 

Maybe, this is true, but muzzles are frequently used by responsible owners in all sorts of situations, such as controlling excitable animals during vet visits, when meeting new dogs, or during busy events and gatherings. Muzzles provide peace of mind if you are worried about a dog’s reaction which helps the owner remain calmer. 

Besides, they now come in lots of cute colors and styles. A muzzle is proactive and it should be considered as such. Much like seeing a horseback rider wearing a helmet. 

 My dog can’t protect himself in a muzzle.

Yes, that right they can’t. That being said it is our responsibility to protect our dog. If you are putting your dog in situations where he feels like he needs to protect himself or needs to protect himself then that maybe is an even bigger problem that is setting your dog up for failure. 

Remember that if you are putting your dog into situations where he has to protect himself he is more likely to be defensive in the future. If your dog has an opportunity to bite a human or another animal that could be a really big problem. This allows you to protect your dog from his behavior in case of an accident.

“I can handle my dog without a muzzle.” and “I really don’t think he needs one” 

A dog biting a human or animal is a big deal. With tougher laws surrounding antisocial dog behavior coming into force. If their dog gets into a situation owners might find themselves worried about what the changes could mean for them. The legal changes mean a possible 14-year prison sentence for owners of dogs that kill, as well as tougher terms for people whose animals attack a person in a home or private property or attack other animals with assistance animals such as guide dogs holding heavier fines. Here’s the deal you don’t only wear a seat belt when you ride in a car because you anticipate getting into a car wreck, it is just in case. If you wear it and don’t get into a wreck it’s no big deal, but if you get into a wreck and you’re not wearing one you may wish you had been. The same is true for a muzzle, if there is any potential for your dog biting a human or animal it is your responsibility to fit your dog with a muzzle. Don’t let ego cloud your judgment.

Muzzle myths

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